Best High Fiber Cat Food

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After studying how much fiber cats need, identifying appropriate fiber sources for cats, and researching the high-fiber cat food market, we recommend Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Funk in the Trunk Chicken in Pumpkin Consomme as the best high fiber cat food on the market.

Most high-fiber foods—think those marketed for indoor cats and hairball control—are bulked up with fiber and other plant ingredients your cat doesn’t need. Too much fiber and too much plant matter give your cat a smelly litter box and a troubled tummy. That’s the opposite of what you want.

Quick Look at Our Top Picks:

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Top Pick

Weruva Cats in the Kitchen
  • Popular among cats with digestive issues
  • Higher fiber content than most wet foods
  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
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Runner Up

Wellness CORE Grain-Free Indoor Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe
  • Primarily made from animal protein
  • Relatively low carbohydrate content
  • ree of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
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Budget Pick

Purina Beyond Indoor Grain-Free Chicken Recipe
  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
  • Free of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
  • A relatively economical buy
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Best Raw Cat Food

Primal Duck Formula Nuggets
  • Low carbohydrate content
  • Contains anti-inflammatory salmon oil
  • Features a mix of duck muscle meat, organs, and bones
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Requires prescription approval

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet
  • Primarily made from animal protein sources
  • Contains prebiotic fiber to support digestive health
  • Made with fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids
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The best high-fiber cat food acknowledges that your cat’s a carnivore and provides just enough fiber to keep his gut healthy without weighing him down.

Top 5 Best High Fiber Cat Foods

The following products provide a little extra fiber while honoring your cat’s carnivorous needs.

On top of fiber content, they have essential qualities like plenty of species-appropriate protein, high moisture content, and minimal carbohydrate matter. They’re made with safe ingredients and created by reputable companies. Some are formulated with digestive health in mind, offering additional support for a smooth move.

Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Funk In The Trunk Chicken in Pumpkin Consomme Grain-Free Canned Cat Food Review

Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Funk

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This Weruva food earns its position as the number one best high fiber cat food not because it has more fiber than other products, but because it’s rich in animal protein, low in carbohydrates, and is made from human-quality ingredients.

The food is primarily made from beef with a little extra fiber from pumpkin, sweet potato, carrot, and xanthan gum. Overall, the food has more plant content than we’d typically want, but at 72% protein and 8.9% carbohydrates on a dry matter basis, it’s still a carnivore-appropriate meal.

The product’s roughly 3.8% fiber content is a rare find in such a meat-centric food. It’s become a favorite among people treating their cats’ constipation and digestive issues. One Chewy reviewer said it was “a Godsend for my 12 year old, 22 pound cat with mega colon and a sensitive stomach.”

Ingredients

Water Sufficient for Processing, Beef, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato, Carrot, Potato Starch, Sunflower Seed Oil, Tricalcium Phosphate, Xanthan Gum, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Taurine, Vitamin E Supplement, Zinc Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Nicotinic Acid (Vitamin B3), Ferrous Sulfate, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Potassium Iodide, Manganese Sulfate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Copper Sulfate, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein10% min
Crude Fat1.3% min
Crude Fiber0.5% max
Moisture86% max
Ash2%

What We Liked:

  • Popular among cats with digestive issues
  • Higher fiber content than most wet foods
  • Low carbohydrate content
  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
  • Made from top-quality ingredients

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Expensive

Wellness CORE Grain-Free Indoor Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe Canned Cat Food Review

Wellness CORE Natural Grain Free Wet Canned Cat Food

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Foods sold for indoor cats operate on the premise that indoor cats are prone to obesity, hairballs, and constipation, necessitating increased fiber.

This Wellness CORE recipe features multiple sources of muscle meat and organs while going light on high-carbohydrate ingredients. It contains pea fiber, ground flaxseed, and multiple types of gums. The food contains guar gum, cassia gum, and xanthan gum as thickeners. Though they’re not the best things a cat could eat, these gums are rich in soluble fiber and can help to improve digestion.

In addition to these fiber sources, the food contains chicory root extract, a type of prebiotic fiber. Prebiotic fiber feeds healthy gut bacteria, supporting digestive health.

Altogether, the food is about 9% fiber on a dry matter basis.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Liver, Chicken Broth, Turkey Broth, Chicken Meal, Turkey, Pea Protein, Dried Ground Peas, Natural Flavor, Cranberries, Pea Fiber, Ground Flaxseed, Guar Gum, Tricalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Cassia Gum, Xanthan Gum, Dried Kelp, Chicory Root Extract, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Salt, Alfalfa Meal, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Niacin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid.

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein11% min
Crude Fat3.5% min
Crude Fiber2.0% max
Moisture78% max
Ash2.4% max

What We Liked:

  • Primarily made from animal protein
  • Contains a mix of insoluble and soluble fiber, including prebiotic fiber
  • Free of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives that could harm your cat
  • Relatively low carbohydrate content

What We Didn’t Like:

  • May contain too many gums for some tastes

Purina Beyond Indoor Grain-Free Chicken Recipe Canned Cat Food Review

Purina Beyond Indoor Grain-Free Chicken Recipe Canned Cat Food

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Relatively affordable compared to the other recipes on this list, this Purina Beyond recipe is marketed for indoor cats and features a mix of chicken, liver, fish, and eggs as sources of protein.

The food contains powdered cellulose, carrots, and guar gum as sources of fiber. It’s a little bit higher in carbohydrates than the other products on this list, with 16.8% carbohydrates on a dry matter basis. At about 11% fiber on a dry matter basis, this is one of the higher-fiber foods on this list. The food’s unusually high fiber content combined with relatively high carbohydrate content make it a less-than-ideal choice for long-term feeding.

Chewy reviewer Shawn says that after feeding his three cats this Beyond recipe, “some digestive situations we were having have cleared up.”

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Broth, Liver, Ocean Whitefish, Powdered Cellulose, Carrots, Dried Egg Product, ESSENTIAL NUTRIENTS AND OTHER INGREDIENTS: Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Salt, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Calcium Carbonate, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide), Vitamins (Vitamin E, Choline, Vitamin B-1, Vitamin B-3, Vitamin B-5, Vitamin A, Vitamin B-6, Vitamin B-2, Vitamin B-12, Vitamin K, Folic Acid, Vitamin D-3), Guar Gum, Taurine. 

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein10% min
Crude Fat5.0% min
Crude Fiber2.5% max
Moisture78% max
Ash3.25% max

What We Liked:

  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
  • Free of artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
  • A relatively economical buy

What We Didn’t Like:

  • High carbohydrate content compared to other wet foods

Primal Duck Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Raw Freeze-Dried Cat Food Review

Primal Duck Formula Nuggets Grain-Free Raw Freeze-Dried Cat Food

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If you prefer to feed your cat a freeze-dried or raw diet, you might like this food from Primal Pet Food. It’s a duck-centric recipe with plenty of duck muscle meat, organs, and bones.

Unlike some raw foods that skip anything indigestible and load up on constipating bone, this food seems to promote healthy digestion. It contains a variety of fibrous ingredients, including carrots, squash, broccoli, and pumpkin seeds. Altogether, the food’s fiber content is around 4% on a dry matter basis.

The food contains salmon oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which can help to relieve inflammation and related digestive issues.

Ingredients

Duck, Duck Necks, Duck Wings, Duck Gizzards, Duck Livers, Organic Carrots, Organic Squash, Organic Kale, Organic Apples, Organic Broccoli, Blueberries, Cranberries, Organic Pumpkin Seeds, Organic Sunflower Seeds, Montmorillonite Clay, Organic Quinoa Sprout Powder, Organic Parsley, Organic Apple Cider Vinegar, Salmon Oil, Taurine, Rosemary Extract, Organic Coconut Oil, Dried Organic Kelp, Alfalfa, Vitamin E Supplement, Mixed Tocopherols (natural preservative).

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein37% min
Crude Fat37% min
Crude Fiber4.0% max
Moisture4.0% max
Ash8.3% max

What We Liked:

  • Made from fresh, minimally-processed animal ingredients
  • Features a mix of duck muscle meat, organs, and bones
  • Low carbohydrate content
  • Contains anti-inflammatory salmon oil

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Expensive

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Gastrointestinal Moderate Calorie Canned Cat Food Review

Royal Canin Veterinary Diet Gastrointestinal Moderate Calorie Canned Cat Food

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Finally, if you want a prescription food that’s specially formulated for cats with gastrointestinal issues, consider this high fiber cat food from Royal Canin.

With 34% fewer calories than its “High Energy” counterpart, this food is formulated for cats who need to lose weight. According to Royal Canin, it contains highly digestible proteins—including pork by-products, chicken, and chicken liver—with prebiotic fiber to support healthy gut bacteria and digestive function.

It contains fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids, which can reduce inflammation and soothe the digestive tract.

The food gets positive reviews from customers, with reviewers saying it helped their cats with diarrhea, allergies, pancreatitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.

On the negative side, this food contains plenty of corn flour and modified corn starch, which sends its carbohydrate content sky-high. This isn’t the kind of food you’d want to feed your cat long-term.

Ingredients

Water Sufficient for Processing, Pork By-Product, Chicken, Chicken Liver, Corn Flour, Modified Corn Starch, Powdered Cellulose, Natural Flavors, Gelatin By-Products, Fish Oil, Carob Bean Gum, Potassium Chloride, Sodium Tripolyphosphate, Calcium Sulfate, Taurine, Hydrolyzed Yeast, Sodium Silico Aluminate, Vitamins [Dl-Alpha Tocopherol Acetate (Source of Vitamin E), L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C), Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Niacin Supplement, Biotin, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement], Trace Minerals [Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Oxide, Ferrous Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate], Marigold Extract (Tagetes Erecta L.).

Guaranteed Analysis:

Crude Protein6.0% min
Crude Fat1.5% min
Crude Fiber2.0% max
Moisture84.5% max
Ashn/a

What We Liked:

  • Primarily made from animal protein sources
  • Contains prebiotic fiber to support digestive health
  • Made with fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids
  • Free of potentially-harmful artificial additives

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Very high carbohydrate content

The right amount of fiber can promote healthy digestion, but don’t overestimate the need to add fiber to your cat’s diet.

Cats are carnivores who live on flesh, fat, and bones. The natural feline diet doesn’t involve cellulose powder, dried tomato pomace, or flaxseed. In contrast to the fiber fermentation machines that are herbivores, cats have short digestive tracts and their bodies don’t spend much time fermenting what they eat.

But they do need a little fiber. When cats consume prey in the wild, they ingest all sorts of indigestible matter—hair, claws, teeth, and connective tissue. Though it’s not fiber in the traditional sense, this indigestible stuff ferments in a cat’s colon and aids digestion. Since most people are unable or unwilling to add back this indigestible animal matter, plant fiber works instead.

Both soluble and insoluble fiber help to promote healthy digestion. They feed good bacteria in the gut and help the stool to retain water. A little bit of fiber is essential to keep your cat’s gut happy and healthy.

While a pinch of fiber is a friend for your cat’s GI tract, there’s no need to fill your cat up with piles of fiber. In fact, most normal dry foods—not even those marketed as high-fiber or indoor foods—have more fiber than a cat’s natural diet would ever include. A cat’s natural diet of fresh, whole rodents would be about 0.55% fiber. Compare that to the 4% fiber content of a standard dry food or the 9-10% fiber content of the typical indoor cat food.

On top of the fact that most cat food has more fiber than cats need, cat food companies market fiber as a solution to problems that it either isn’t the best solution to or simply can’t solve.

For example, your overweight cat doesn’t need a high-fiber diet to stay satisfied and lose weight. He’d be better off filling up on something carnivore-appropriate—like water.

If he’s already eating a normal diet, your hairball-prone cat doesn’t need more fiber to sweep hair through his digestive tract. Fiber is not a broom and your cat doesn’t need to be swept like a kitchen floor. It’s normal for cats to eat hair, whether it’s their prey’s hair or their own. That hair moves through the GI tract and comes out in the stool. That’s normal. Frequent hairball hacking is indicative of deeper digestive problems, not a fiber deficiency.

Too much fiber could inhibit the secretion of pancreatic enzymes that digest protein, decreasing nutrient absorption and, ultimately, making your cat less healthy. Elisa Katz, DVM says that she’s seen this problem “in many cats fed a commercial prescription diet known to be high in fiber. Their coats become dry and flaky and their stools become huge.”

If, after switching your cat to one of the above foods or something similar, your cat is still having digestive issues, more fiber isn’t the answer. There are likely deeper issues at work.

You might be interested in reading our articles on the best foods for cats with common digestive issues. 

In addition to listing top foods for each condition, these pieces share information about their causes, symptoms, and treatment.

About the author


Mallory Crusta is a writer and adventurecat enthusiast on a mission to make cats’ lives extraordinary. She’s one of the founders of Wildernesscat – a site for happy, healthy, and adventurous cats who are fueled by nature. Visit Wildernesscat for radically natural cat nutrition, home remedies, and lifestyle inspiration.

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